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Advertising, is it gambling or investment?


#1

to all

does advertising a trust based product like engagement jewelry or
diamonds cheapen what you are selling?

does advertising a diamond as a gift from the heart for a lifelong
commitment between two people reduce the sense of authenticity of
the token (the ring)?

in the case of the several retail stores i worked for before i open
my own custom jewelry shop the only thing advertising wise that
actually got a fair response was this, it was a coupon for a half
price watch battery printed on the reverse side of the register
reciept tape from the grocery store. The only printed media item that
brought response for me was the story in the local paper about how
local jeweler jeweler opens shop and hand make beautifull jewelry.

( these are two completly opposing forms of adverting ) i have been
told many things by those selling advertising on printed media ,
magazine, newspaper etc. such as #1 you have to do it alot every
week month etc. #2 you have to use a bigg ad #3 you have to track
the response offer somthing free or discounted which all basicly
translate to more money for those selling the advertising.

I have also read that print based advertising only works minimally
so i have been focusing on web based advertising and if i put
anything in print from now on it will be my dot com address.

but as a subject this may have been hashed to death on the list and
maybe i missed the hashing but in these economicly down times none
of us need to spend money if it is going to be misdirected on bad
advertising i think it would be good for all of us to put our heads
together so we can present expectations to those taking our hard
earned money in exchange for exposure.

best regards goo


#2

Hi Goo,

What my marketing training has taught me it to survey your customers
or potential customers as to what they think is the best (Fill in the
Blank). You take the most given answer and use that as a Button to
get the potential customer’s attention. Once you have their attention
then you can give them your message.

In my old business you offer them something under 40.00 clams shells
that would be of value to them. This gets them into to visit or
patronize you. This is your opportunity to impress them and get their
follow-up business.

If I was lucky I would get 2% response. To the customers I am trying
to get in to my shop. Once in to the shop I would use a quarterly
news letter to let them get to know me. I would offer some good to
know and a special or two I would use to get their return
business.

It was recommended that 5% to 6% of our gross income should be spent
on advertising.

Next I would recommend that you look at statcounter.com and
incorporate it into your website. It allows you to look at the number
of hits your website gets and there is other detailed it
can provide. I use this so I can tell that when a particular form of
advertisement I have used has peaked any interest in my website. If
the counts go way up then you know your ad worked. It is now up to
you to get the response you wish with what you offer. If the counts
don’t budge then you know that ad didn’t generate any interest.

Let us say you put out a particular ad on the internet and you refer
to your website. By watching the Stat Counter you can see if there
was any interest. Once you get the interest then it is up to your
special to get the response you wish.

I don’t know if this will help or not. Good luck

Ken Moore
www.kenworx.com


#3

Advertising works like magic if it is done right. This is true for
jewelry or anything else. Do it wrong and it is a complete waste of
time and money. How do you do it right? That is the million dollar
question. There is no one-size-fits-all answer. It is definitely a
gamble to try it, but if you don’t advertise, how is anyone going to
know you are there?

In the 1990s I broke the code for small space magazine advertising
and did very well in mail order for a few years, running little ads
in Smithsonian Magazine. At over a thousand dollars a column inch
they seemed like a big gamble when I started, but they were so
productive that I could not afford not to do them. That is until
everything changed, as it always does. BY 2000 they were not working
for me. Now I do a lot of cheap radio ads in my rural hometown area.
But I have a second store about a hundred miles away in Rochester,
NY. I really don’t have a clue how to advertise up there. Radio ads
are more than 5x the price in that market. We have had some success
with TV and print, but have not yet really found good advertising
value yet for that store. If you figure it out, let me know.

Stephen Walker


#4

Hi Goo:

In one of my alternate lives, I do variable-data printing. Picture a
Word mail-merge, on steroids. Ever wonder at those catalogs you get
that seem to have just what you want, without pages of crap that
doesn’t interest you? Variable data. With the software that’s out
there, you can rig it up so that it mines the customer data, and
swaps in images, products, and even prices, based on in
your customer data. The problem is the depth of the data. Give me
enough data, and I can target anybody, but most stores and galleries
don’t collect enough data to give them a decent lock on who their
customers are, and what they want.

Think about those ‘loyalty cards’ that the groceries give out. Those
have nothing to do with loyalty, they’re a way to get you to ID
yourself to the marketing database. They track your purchases over
years, and build a profile of who you are, what you buy, and which
brands you like. This gives them a baseline to compare against when
they do advertising. If they drop the price of Coke, do you buy more?
Does anybody buy more? If they hike it, what percentage of customers
buy less than their historic average? If they know you never buy
meat, they don’t waste their money sending you coupons for ribeyes,
they send you coupons for lettuce instead.

There are also systems that have a web tie-in, so that each campaign
has a website that the customer can go to to learn more about the
product. This is good for the customer, but it’s great for the
advertiser: each mail piece has an individual URL on it, so each
customer has their own landing page, customized with name and
initial marketing setup. As the customer clicks through the site (if
they do), the system keeps track of what they look at, if they
respond, and where they finally quit. (there’s usually a bit of
cheese…err…a coupon at the end of the maze to reward the
diligent.) That way you can tell not only how many, but exactly
which people on your mailing list responded favorably enough to
bother to look up the web-link you sent them. Therefore, you target
these folks for a follow-up mailing, tailored to exactly what parts
of the website seemed to interest them.

Typical mass mailings have a response rate in the 2-3 % range.
Targeted variable mailings run around 33% response, or better. I
haven’t seen reliable figures on the web enabled stuff, but I’d
guess it’s even higher, say 40%. The variable ones are more expensive
to print, so they’d better have a higher ROI.

So, start pondering your customer list, and what gems of information
may be contained within it. Give some thought to what you can do to
expand both the quantity and quality of data that you have on your
customers. Who are they? Where are they? What do they like? If all
you’ve got is name, address, and first purchase date, there’s not
much you can do to distinguish the retiree who gets his watch battery
changed every 2 years, from the corporate exec who bought a $5000
set of earrings for their anniversary. How do you tell these two guys
apart? Because you certainly want to pitch them differently.

I’d suggest starting to track name, address, phone & email if
they’ll give it, first purchase date, most recent contact date, all
purchases, both dollar amount, and type of item, as well as any time
they contact you, and what they’re looking for. There’s probably more
info that would give a better targeting solution, but it’s got to be
something that’s reasonably easy and quick to acquire and enter,
otherwise you won’t do it, and they won’t hang around long enough to
answer 50 questions.

That’s the reason for those ‘loyalty cards’. They’re a quick
positive ID for the system, which then just ingests all of the
register from your transaction, and adds it to your
customer record, all automagically. That works great for groceries,
because nobody really ‘window shops’ the grocery. They buy. So
grabbing completed transaction info gives a pretty complete record of
what they’re interested in. For a jeweler, I’d stop and ponder some
sort of way for the sales folks to log inquiries and window-shopping.
Maybe offer a free steam-cleaning or ultrasonic-rinse to get people
in, and make a loyalty card part of that setup, so you’ve got an ID
on them, and then have the sales people code in the types of items
they looked at after they leave, assuming they don’t buy anything.
The loyalty card gives you a firm ID without having to ask for name,
rank & serial #.

Once you know who’s interested in what, then you can figure out how
to target your advertising. (to grossly paraphrase Sun-tzu: “know
yourself, know your enemy…err customer…and everything else will
take care of itself.”)

Regards,
Brian Meek.

PS–>If you want to learn business, you could do much worse than to
read Sun-Tzu. (“The Art of War”) Swap “customer” for “enemy” and it
reads like a Wharton School Primer. No, I’m not really joking. Much.


#5

As someone who has done print advertising for years I can tell you
that 1) you do have to do it regularly, 2) it doesn’t cheapen the
product and 3) no you do not have to run big ads. However, that being
said we have been reducing our print advertising dramatically and
plan to continue to do so next year. This is not because of the
economy (in fact a good guerilla marketer will increase their
advertising budget during down times) but because people aren’t
reading newsprint anymore, at least not young people. Since my core
business of engagement rings and wedding bands is what keeps me going
through good and bad times, and since that involves mostly young
people, I’m going where they are, which happens to be online. So
we’re boosting our online presence as much as possible in various
search engines. Currently about 50% of my walk-ins are referrals,
about 40% find us online and only about 10% are coming in from the
newsprint advertising. I’ve read the writing on the walls and am
responding accordingly.

Daniel R. Spirer, G.G.
Daniel R. Spirer Jewelers, LLC
www.spirerjewelers.com


#6

In a former life I was advertising manager of a local weekly
newspaper. I often got the “is it really worth it” question. My
answer was: it depends. For some things, yes, print media is
absolutely worth it. No question. For others, it is not the best/
most efficient/cheapest way to advertise. If you ONLY advertise on
the web, you have severely limited your audience - in most areas
there are still significant portions of the population that do not
use the web at all, and even more that don’t shop on the web.

One example of print media working: I had an account, a
locally-owned pharmacy that also sold a huge range of general
merchandise - sort of a dollar store kind of thing before there were
really dollar stores. One Christmas I convinced him to run a full
page color ad two weeks in a row featuring a range of items that
would be appealing as Christmas presents. He called in a huge upset
two days after the first ad ran demanding that I pull and not run the
second one - poor guy had more customers than he could deal with!
True story!

The key to any advertising expenditure is to understand your target
market; to aim you advertising to that market and select the correct
media, and the correct purveyor of that media (all print media is not
created equal; nor is all radio, etc.); to create the correct ad for
that media; to run it at the right time/size/color/whatever; and to
understand the time line you can reasonably expect a response in.
Some ads, like the story mentioned above, are intended to bring in
immediate business. Some ads - keeping a business card sized ad in a
local shopper paper - are long-term visibility ads, which may not get
a response in any given week, but over time will bring in significant
business. I have used repair services just because I have seen their
ads over and over in the business card section of our local shopper
paper.

Just be realistic in what you expect your advertising to do.

For me, keeping an e-mail list of customers, and sending out a
mailing when I have a show or exhibition coming up, works very, very
well as a fairly free advertising medium. Couple that with targeted
print media ads (we have a wonderful monthly “magazine” that is
regional, aimed at a fairly high-end ladies market that is very
worthwhile) and that covers it for me right now.

If you are featuring hand made, you might also contact your local
arts commission or tourism office, and see if you can piggy back on
anything they are doing. Ours does national ads featuring local hand
made items.

Beth Wicker
Three Cats and a Dog Design Studio
http://www.bethwicker.com


http://bethwicker.ganoksin.com/blogs/


#7

Hi Goo,

This is a link to a very interesting little article from the New
Yorker. It discusses what many businesses feel and fear during a
serious economic downturn. Whether to hunker down or seize market
share through advertising. I think that if there was ever a time to
advertise, this is it. If there was ever a time to put money in the
stock market, this it it. Opportunities exist today that we haven’t
seen for years.

Hanging Tough
by James Surowiecki 
http://tinyurl.com/cuwt8m

Mark


#8

Advertising sure is a vexed and vexing question! We are bombarded
with advertising for every possible type of product in a bewildering
range of makes and types at every turn and in every form of media.

I suspect most of us ‘switch off’ 99% of the time, but at some
point, an image and some wording will connect with something we’ve
been thinking about possibly acquiring and a decision is made - “I’ll
get one of those.”

What happens next MAY be that I go to that advertiser and buy THAT
specific item. More likely, I will research (web or good old
fashioned phone book) to see if there is a better, more reliable or
even just plain cheaper product at a more conveniently located
outlet.

It seems to me virtually impossible to compete in advertising with
the big boys in the same industry. A small, local jeweller with one
shop who makes beautiful pieces probably shouldn’t even want to
compete - he’s in a different category entirely, and so is his target
market. The greatest challenges in any form of advertising are
defining your ‘target market’ and then in finding or creating the
type of advertisement that will actually reach them. I don’t know how
big your town is, how many jewellery stores there are, whether any of
them also make or whether they simply sell mass produced stuff, or
what percentage of the town and surrounding population have the money
and social makeup to either buy your work or have you make a piece
just for them.

thumb’ says that a 2.5% response rate is very good (this was for a
direct mailout to a purchased address list).

Articles in a local paper, preferably with a photo of you at the
workbench, either as a real story (e.g. your recent exhibition, or a
piece accepted into a high profile exhibition) or as an ‘advertorial’
(an advertisement in the form of a ‘news’ story for which you part
with good money will bring you local response.

You write that “you have to track the response offer something free
or discounted which all basically translate to more money for those
selling the advertising.” This isn’t quite accurate, in that the
cost of the advertisement is the same whether or not you offer
something free or discounted. The ‘offer’ gives you a tool whereby
you can physically track the response rate to your advert. Because
word of mouth advertising is the best, insurance salesmen are trained
to ask for referrals. Your customers may be happy to tell their
friends where they bought this beautiful piece. Web based advertising
is something else again. It takes some really concentrated research
and probably some serious money to choose the ‘key words’ which will
bring your site to the top of the list in the web browser. For
example, if you Google ‘Australian Jewellery’ (English spelling!) my
site turns up near the bottom of the third page. If you Google
’natural gem’ it’s on the first page.

I don’t have a single answer to the two questions you ask at the
beginning of your post. As to it being a gamble - yes, it is, but
the better targeted and directed it is, the better the odds of a win!
Nor do I have a clear answer to what is the best form of advertising
for you, or for other Orchidians. I’m looking forward to reading what
others have to say in response - and I hope there are a few
Australians who respond too.

Jane Walker
Australian Natural Gem Jewellery


#9
This is a link to a very interesting little article from the New
Yorker. It discusses what many businesses feel and fear during a
serious economic downturn. Whether to hunker down or seize market
share through advertising. I think that if there was ever a time
to advertise, this is it. If there was ever a time to put money in
the stock market, this it it. Opportunities exist today that we
haven't seen for years. 

Today’s Fun Fact:

The New Yorker is a magazine that is entirely supported by
advertising revenue. Perhaps it is a coincidence that they propose
that advertising is essential in an economic ‘downturn’, just when
their advertising revenue is hitting rock bottom.

Today’s ‘opportunity’ is to streamline operational costs to the
point of being able to survive either a) the next few months or b)
the next few years of soft-to-no sales, so that we can be one of the
few survivors when things are sorted out. According to industry
reports, Harry Winston’s sales were down 60% in the US, while
Tiffany’s were down 33%. Neither company is known for scrimping on
advertising.

To those who ‘dabble’ in jewelry, or sell at a few art fairs per
year:

Don’t sweat it, advertising is meaningless on your level. Better to
maintain good contact with your regular clients and make sure that
they are happy with your work and service. The word-of-mouth is far
more valuable than mailing lists and newspaper ads for you.

Lee Cornelius
Vegas Jewelers


#10

A friend who is a jewelry on Hilton Head Island, Thomas Blair, just
had a fabulous piece of exposure - a local tv show on design featured
him in an entire segment. Very well done. The kind of advertising you
can’t buy!

http://www.whhitv.com/LOD/movies/LOD_IslandGold0409_NEW.wmv

Beth Wicker


#11
Harry Winston's sales were down 60% in the US, while Tiffany's were
down 33%. Neither company is known for scrimping on advertising. 

I believe these figures were for the holiday season only (I know they
were for Tiffany’s, I didn’t see the about Harry
Winston’s). However I haven’t seen Tiffany’s cut back on their
advertising because of it. There was an economic downturn. Luxuries
suffered. Hence the drop in sales. I don’t think you can correlate
this particular economic climate with whether their advertising is
working or not. Most good advertising (especially for places like
Tiffany’s) is long term based, designed to create an image and carry
a certain long term message (“I’m a luxury retailer”, “I’m a discount
retailer”, “I have sales all the time”). The fact that their sales
were off during one particular period does not mean the advertising
isn’t working. Actually the question should really be “How much MORE
down would their sales have been without advertising?”

Don't sweat it, advertising is meaningless on your level. Better
to maintain good contact with your regular clients and make sure
that they are happy with your work and service. The word-of-mouth
is far more valuable than mailing lists and newspaper ads for you. 

As I said in my first posting on this, I’m in the middle of
switching my advertising budget away from newsprint, but that doesn’t
mean that advertising doesn’t work for anyone who is willing to do it
right. During the recession in the early 90’s we started our
newsprint advertising campaign. We saw our sales DOUBLE over a three
year period because of it, and that was during a recession!

Daniel R. Spirer, G.G.
Daniel R. Spirer Jewelers, LLC
www.spirerjewelers.com


#12
Don't sweat it, advertising is meaningless on your level. Better
to maintain good contact with your regular clients and make sure
that they are happy with your work and service. The word-of-mouth
is far more valuable than mailing lists and newspaper ads for you. 

thank you for saying this because it was in the recess’ of my mind
when i asked the question “does it cheapen a trust based product like
a diamond engagement ring when you advertise or advertise in certain
ways?”

i think alot of us on orchid fall into the nether regions of
tradditional type definitions on “A business Model” I dont consider
myself a retail jeweler because other than chains,stud earrings and
a few other pieces and parts like some prong heads . i dont purchase
and resell finished goods.

i am attempting to focus the retail portion of my business on to
diamond sales which is what i want to focus the advertising on.

one can argue who he target is for advertising engagement rings is
it the male or the female or in the case of gay marriage the more
dominant member of the couple

#1 i think i would like to get thier attention BEFORE they are ready
to pop the question

#2 there seem to be two types of buyers the ones that pick out the
ring then ask the girl and the ones that bring the girl design the
ring and then make the girl wait several months to get ring at the
formal proposal.

#3 then there are " girl scouts " the girls who know thier
boyfriends are going to ask they go find what they want then go tell
the guy where to shop

#4 then there are the couples who go out together and somtimes girl
leaves when it comes time to talk price and somtimes the woman does
all the talking and tells him this is what you want.

somtimes ive found the younger the buyer the general degree of
increase in the “choke factor” when presented with the price of the
stone they would like to own which is usally falls into the G - SI 1
somtimes F-VS2 range, at which point they leave and go buy somthing
from a big box store for the same amount of money but lower quality.

at one point i was attempting to research advertising on dating
websites which comicly resulted in dozens p/day of " have sex with
me now " spam e-mails, go figure !.

how where and how does one get to buyer first that is the question
to which i so desire an opportunity i am considering giving
presentations about diamonds and jewelry to college sororities and
fraterinities what do you think ?

back to lee’s input i still need the first 100 diamond customers to
follow up with and give out the word of mouth

best regards goo


#13

goo,

You seem to be looking all around the questions instead of focusing
on what the question is. I’m not sure what you do as a jeweler since
you say:

I dont consider myself a retail jeweler because other than
chains,stud earrings and a few other pieces and parts like some
prong heads. i dont purchase and resell finished goods. 

Well if you’re selling to the public, whatever it is that you’re
selling, then you are a retail jeweler. If you’re making everything
you sell but you still sell to the public then you are a retail
jeweler. I don’t sell anything I don’t make (except commercial chains
and a line of knives I carry) but I’m still a retail jeweler. And if
retailing is what you do then you have to approach it all from that
standpoint. Just because you’re not a “traditional” jeweler doesn’t
mean the same rules of retail don’t apply to you.

You’re worried about who will be doing the buying in an engagement
ring purchase. It doesn’t really matter. What matters is that you get
people in buying and that you differentiate yourself from the
traditional jewelers. I do great with gay clients, women who know
what they want for an engagement ring and guys who think outside the
box. But my marketing is to ANYONE because if I can’t get them in my
shop I can’t get to the ones who I will do best with. I have lots of
customers come in who don’t buy. I don’t really care as long as I get
enough in who DO buy. Granted my marketing always includes pictures
of my work, which is different enough that I won’t get in people
looking for traditional stuff, but I still have to get it seen.

Word of mouth is great once you’ve gotten established, and it’s also
fine if you have time to grow slowly. Certainly I started out that
way in my store. I didn’t start advertising until ten years after we
opened, but we were in somewhat simpler (and less expensive) times
then, and I supplemented my income occasionally. Nowadays you need to
ramp up much quicker and bring in much larger amounts sooner to make
it in retail (especially in urban, more expensive, areas).
Advertising can work wonders for any size business. Maybe you won’t
have the budget I do right now, but you can work with smaller budgets
if you spend some time doing some research on it. There were a series
of books out a number of years ago called “Guerrilla Marketing” and
"Guerrilla Marketing Attack". With the exception that they don’t deal
with the Internet (although the guy may have updated them by now)
they are great resources for marketing on a budget. 'Actually, I
think with the advent of the Internet, and the collapse of newsprint
to some extent, it is actually less expensive to set up a good
marketing plan.

i am attempting to focus the retail portion of my business on to
diamond sales which is what i want to focus the advertising on. 

In my line of thinking, this is exactly what you DON’T want to do.
Everybody sells diamonds. What do you sell that no one else sells?
Are your designs unique? Do you have a particular design you make
that says it’s your style. Do you use recycled metals? These are the
things that you should be selling. And if you are going to sell
diamonds then you don’t want to sell what someone can get anywhere.
Why not focus on smaller, D color, Flawless stones? Something that
people cannot find at any jeweler. Or a branded diamond. As a small
jeweler you can’t compete on price. You need to compete with
something else. I have a constant call in with Lazare Kaplan (my
diamond dealer) for stones under a half carat that are flawless and
top color because every single one I can get (admittedly it isn’t
many) I can sell, and much more quickly than my VVS or VS stones.
Why? Because no one else has them!

at one point i was attempting to research advertising on dating
websites which comically resulted in dozens p/day of " have sex
with me now " spam e-mails, go figure !. 

Dating sites won’t be a good place. The people on them are looking
to START dating. They are nowhere near the idea of proposing or
getting married. Look at the wedding sites.

Daniel R. Spirer, G.G.
Daniel R. Spirer Jewelers, LLC
www.spirerjewelers.com


#14

This doesn’t really answer the original question, but it is food for
thought.

Many on this forum are making some form of jewelry as something of
an interest or hobby they have, meaning that they have some other
source of income. But I imagine that just as many are making what
they make to support themselves. When you make that leap from making
it just for fun to making it for your livelihood, usually your
perspective changes. You begin to look for what you can do that is as
close as you can get to what you love to do…but still make enough
money to live. Often compromises are made. You begin to focus on
money as much as jewelry. And to make the money you start to wonder
if you should advertise. You see others advertising and they seem
successful. It’s natural to question your choices, do it or don’t I?
I don’t have an answer because it’s always a very individual
decision. If your goal is to make lots of money, then you need to
advertise, right? Well, maybe not.

As an example, I know two retail jewelers very well. One has 5 huge
strategically placed stores and about 80 employees. The other has one
store and 2 employees. The one with the 5 stores is on the radio all
the time, everybody has heard of his business, and he does tons of
business… it’s unbelievable how much he does. The other guy with
the single store almost never advertises, only sometimes in the local
paper in his small town. But he is always busy. So who is doing
better? That’s hard to say. In the Midwest it’s very impolite to ask
how much people make. But if your goal is a comfortable, financially
secure life for yourself and your family, they both seem to have
achieved that. They each have beautiful homes near their work and
they each have lovely second homes, one has one in Palm Springs and
the other has one in Florida. Life is good for both. It’s funny how
comparable their lives are, same business, same part of the
country… yet their approaches to their businesses are so different.
Particularly when it comes to advertising.

It just goes to show you…
Mark


#15
It's funny how comparable their lives are, same business, same part
of the country... yet their approaches to their businesses are so
different. Particularly when it comes to advertising. 

My question would be how much better might the company that doesn’t
advertise be doing if they did advertise? If they are doing as well
as the advertiser without it, they might do phenomenally better if
they did advertise. After all something they are doing is already
working really well. If they get their name out there a little more
they might have significant increases in their business. Are they
happy doing what they are right now? We can’t answer that, but if
they did want to grow their business more, they might want to try
the advertising. Because they’re busy without it doesn’t necessarily
mean they wouldn’t be a whole lot busier with it.

Daniel R. Spirer, G.G.
Daniel R. Spirer Jewelers, LLC
www.spirerjewelers.com


#16

Hi Mark,

I’d hasten to add there is a difference between advertising and
marketing, the former being a version of the latter.

In any case, although we may see no “advertising” from jeweler #2,
I’ll bet a ton of donuts he is doing plenty of marketing. For
instance, mining an existing customer list can easily produce 80%
plus of annual sales, and an outsider would never see it.

And if you sell something besides toilet paper, you’d better be
marketing.

Wayne Emery
The Gemcutter


#17
... And to make the money you start to wonder if you should
advertise. You see others advertising and they seem successful.
It's natural to question your choices, do it or don't I? I don't
have an answer because it's always a very individual decision. If
your goal is to make lots of money, then you need to advertise,
right? Well, maybe not. ( this quote was followed by an example of
two jewelers success storie one does one doesnt advertise)

mark- this is great stuff you wrote and a good point because part of
what i am wondering about is how advertising attracts or somtimes
repels customers.The specifics and mechanics, looking at the weekend
newspaper i try to put myself into the role of the " buyer " while i
look over the ads and what i find is that i even though i see the
full page color photo’s i block them out for things that dont intrest
me such as furniture but i am attracted or more open to ads for
things that do intrest me, or i can see how if my car needed tires i
would look at the ad for tires and consider shopping there if i liked
thier brand . The one jeweler who advertises alot gets customers
because some think i am going to buy jewelry then they remember they
saw the ad and others might remember how they should go and do some
research and find the second jeweler who doesnt advertise and they
find somthing more to thier liking. t’ is a thckening plot - best
regards goo


#18

Hi Goo,

The one jeweler who advertises alot gets customers because some
think i am going to buy jewelry then they remember they saw the ad
and others might remember how they should go and do some research
and find the second jeweler who doesnt advertise and they find
somthing more to thier liking. 

I always like to keep things as simple as possible (maybe because
otherwise I don’t get it). To me the whole idea is to get people to
think about your business when they are ready to buy what you sell.

One local jeweler who does lots of custom runs a regular little ad
that shows some of his work. The ad is always different and I make a
point of checking it out when I read the paper. It’s simple and it
gets people thinking that he’s a talented guy and maybe they could
have him make them something someday? That’s all you need, that
little seed planted. If you don’t have good word of mouth or a
visible location or advertise, how will they think of you?

Daniel rightly pointed out that if the jeweler who doesn’t advertise
took the plunge, he might really grow his business. Another
interesting thing about the two jewelers in the example and something
that sort of answers Daniel’s question, that is that the two
businesses really reflect the two owners different personalities. The
guy with 5 stores and all of the advertising really gets juiced by
growing his business, restructuring his internal systems, opening a
new store and making big changes. He gets bored if his business is
just running smoothly and making lots of money. The guy with the
single store wants it to stay busy and grow slightly, but he is not
interested in getting bigger and dealing with troublesome employees.
He loves his work and is very good at it, but being the biggest or
most well known is not something he’s interested in. Maybe a key to
success is to try to be who you are?

Mark


#19

You know, it’s no longer necessary to say “50% of my advertising
budget is wasted, I just don’t know which half.”

Google adwords are measurable. If an ad is not working, you can see
that, and you change it. You can see exactly your click through
rate.

Elaine
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com


#20

For almost 50 years my father ran a very successful business without
ever advertising once! More business than the company could cope
with came just from word-of-mouth recommendations. I have the same
situation and, whilst I have a web page which shows some of the work
I have done in an ‘educational resource’ fashion, it carries no
advertising or suggestion that I am soliciting for business. For
myself, I would only use a company that advertises if a) I had
received a personal recommendation of their abilities from a friend
or colleague and I had seen their work first hand or b) no
alternative company existed. This applies to an even greater degree
to companies who have flyers pushed through my door or who send out
doorstep salesmen - all their literature goes straight in the
recycling bin unread (except for companies who send out pre-paid
reply envelopes which I generally stuff with other companies
advertising literature and send back…) and salesmen usually learn
just how rude I can be!! The reason for this is that I equate a need
to advertise with a failing company, higher than necessary prices
and probably shoddy work. Any company which produces good work or a
good product and satisfies its customers will have a waiting list of
customers…

Best wishes
Ian
Ian W Wright
Sheffield UK