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Acetylene BUGS


#1

Maybe it’s just me, but didn’t anyone ever tell you that if you
don’t want those little black particles floating around as you
light an acetylene torch that ALL you have to do is CRACK the O2
valve just slightly? It’s something to do with the amount of O2,
a little more than atmosphere and it won’t happen.(ask John
Burgess why). Have an ex- employer this drove crazy- grounds for
termination with him! Regards-


#2
   Maybe it's just me, but didn't anyone ever tell you that if
you don't want those little black particles floating around as
you light an acetylene torch that ALL you have to do is CRACK
the O2 valve just slightly? It's something to do with the
amount of O2, a little more than atmosphere and it won't
happen.(ask John Burgess why).

G’day; When acetylene is burnt from a nozzle with extra air
injection (like one sees in plumber’s. etc,. torches the low
temperature ofthe flame cracks theacetylene to it’s component
molecules CH2=CH2 : 2C + 2 H2 The hydrogen burns, heating up
some of the carbon particles and some are oxidised to provide the
yellowish flame, but not all. So the remainder of the carbon
floats about in the atmosphere to annoy acetylene-using
jewellers. Add the smallest amount of oxygen and the carbon is
instantly oxidised to carbon dioxide CO2. So, providing you
have anti-flashback devices in your torch
you just open the oxy
valve the slightest bit (feel the slight draught on your
dampened lips) then open the gas valve as usual and presto! no
floaters. More than you wanted to know, but Ricky Low rang my
bell. Cheers

        /\
       / /    John Burgess, 
      / /
     / //\    @John_Burgess2
    / / \ \
   / (___) \
  (_________)

#3

Hi Guys - Wasn’t even thinking oxy-acetylene torches when I
asked about reaming them out - was only remembering to the
classes I took where we used acetylene torches and had no oxy
component. John had a point about the flashback valve, tho,
that makes sense. Laura


#4

Maybe it’s just me, but didn’t anyone ever tell you that if you
don’t want those little black particles floating around as you
light an acetylene torch that ALL you have to do is CRACK the O2
valve just slightly? It’s something to do with the amount of O2,
a little more than atmosphere and it won’t happen.(ask John
Burgess why). Have an ex- employer this drove crazy- grounds for
termination with him! Regards-

Ricky,

I don’t know if you’ve noticed, but there seem to be a lot of
people dumping on acetylene as a gas for torch usage. I’ve been
using a Little Torch setup with acetylene/oxygen for some time now
and am quite satisfied with the results. This combination gives you
a lot of heat in a very confined, tightly controlled space. If you
are fairly dexterous with the flame, you can do wonders with
everything that requires surgically applied fire. A lot of talk
centers around the “dirtiness” of acetelyene; however, a really
focused ventilation system takes care of the deposits in the air.
And if you’re worried about how the flame reacts to gold, it’s all
a matter of control. I’ve used the aceteylene/oxygen combination
on 14K, 18K, 22K, and 24K and it is just fine for the kind of work
I do. I’m really curious as to why so many people prefer natural
gas/air/oxygen to acetelyne/air/oxygen. Thanks in advance for your
reply.

David


#5

Hello David Palnick- Me personally I have no problem with
acetylene-I have and do use it from time to time considering the
job and equipment available. The main problem with it as far as
your ONLY fuel is if you’re working platinum ocassionally in
addition to other materials, which acetylene is not good for as
we’re told by the experts, leads to contamination of the platinum.
Use propane for platinum instead, maybe, unless you want those
shanks cracking when you stretch them upsize. This contamination
also makes the platinum not engrave so well, and it tends to break
in thin portions, which is supposed to be one of Pt.‘s strengths.
What with the current popularity of the hand engraved platinum
rings, we can’t have that, can we?H2 is good, but hard to see the
flame to me, similar to an alcohol flame almost.Regards-RL HOU TX
USA 30* 4’ N 95*33’W


#6
  I'm really curious as to why so many people prefer natural
gas/air/oxygen to acetelyne/air/oxygen. Thanks in advance for
your reply.

hi David,

i like propane/oxygen. i find it to be most versatile over any
other gas for all types of jewlelry work. everything, including
casting platinum.

best regards,

geo fox