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A Miniature cubic zirconia steam machine


#1

Here is something different—if it works. I am attempting to make a
miniature faceted steam machine out of Cubic Zirconia.
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/1p3

meevis.com


#2
something different---if it works. I am attempting to make a
miniature faceted steam machine out of Cubic Zirconia.
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/1p3 

Hans, this looks seriously cool-- I can’t wait for the next
installment!

But I confess (please forgive) I don’t understand what your little
machine does, even the metal one.

Noel


#3

Hans, I think you will have a special place in steampunk lore.

Have fun. Tom Arnold


#4

I love it! Usually I’m bored stiff by miniature steam engines and
the like, but yours is dead cool.


#5

Hans:

Verrry cool.

One question though: why bore the cylinder right through a pair of
glue joints? This worries me. (Not that I expect it to explode, just
that it’s a weak spot, and I can’t see a reason for doing it
deliberately.)

very, very cool though,
Brian.


#6
I confess (please forgive) I don't understand what your little
machine *does*, even the metal one. 

Noel, I was confused too, till I looked at his photos. As jewelers we
get confused because “steam machine” suggests our steam cleaners.
That’s not what Hans is building. Think instead, "steam engine"
Remember the old steam locomotives? Attached to the main drive
wheels was this complex cylinder and piston and valve arrangement
that took steam from the big boiler, and used it to power the wheels.
What Hans built in metal was that “engine” part. Feed it steam
pressure, or air pressure in the top inlet pipe, and the piston
section works to turn the little flywheel. Or presumably, power some
tiny apparatus. The metal model ones are already cool enough. To
build a transparent facetted one from CZ? amazing. Hans, when you get
it finished and running, I suspect I’m not the only one who’d enjoy a
video clip of the thing in action

Peter Rowe


#7
I confess (please forgive) I don't understand what your little
machine *does*, even the metal one. 

Noel, nothing— except look pretty.

Oh and make a choo choo noise from time to time.

But basically they are just there to look at.

This year I decided to do no projects that I know I can do
successfully.

Rather I decided that everything I tackle must have a high chance of
failure.

So I only have a vague idea of what to do when I start.

Thus the moving parts of my gem steam machine in my previous blog
post were actually made three times before I got it running with out
breaking.

Learned a lot of stuff that way.
Cheers, Hans


#8
This year I decided to do no projects that I know I can do
successfully. Rather I decided that everything I tackle must have a
high chance of failure. So I only have a vague idea of what to do
when I start. 

Hans are you by any chance taking suggestions? (hee-hee)

Hans Durstling
in subarctic Moncton NB Canada


#9
 Hans, when you get it finished and running, I suspect I'm not the
only one who'd enjoy a video clip of the thing in action 

Thanks Peter. You are right, I should say steam engine ( it’s the
ten second flash to bang I suffer from )

Actually this is my second one. I have a bigger one that I finished
last month that runs. ( surprisingly ) With that one I only faceted
the sugalite piston and I held true to the concept that everything
must be made out of stone. The rest of the stone parts are carved and
drilled.

http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/1bg

With the CZ one I have made the sliding parts ( piston and shafts)
out of 14ct gold. And here the focus is firstly to get it running and
then to see, after all the components are faceted, the play of light
that the facets ( hopefully ) will create.

why bore the cylinder right through a pair of glue joints?

Simply because I want to push the envelope, Brian.

That stone was marked for faceting in the conventional way, but the
rough just happened to be in the wrong place at the right time.

I use Hxtal resin to bond the stones together, and the joint is
actually stronger than the CZ material itself.

(I have deliberately broken a few pieces before, to test the
strength of my laminated stones.)

Also the pressures are not high, typically from 10 to 20 pounds on a
small machine, so I don’t think it will split.

And it looks cool!
Cheers, Hans


#10

Dear Hans -

I know I won’t be able to do it in this life, but in the next, may I
please apprentice with you? I love your attitude!

It’s what I’ve been doing lately (though not with such a lofty
goal); I just wish I’d started 30 years ago.

(I was raised with, “You’d better do it perfectly the first time, or
else!” Better the little trouble for not doing, than the big trouble
for a failed attempt. That’s a tough habit to overcome as an adult.)

best regards,
Kelley


#11

Sounds like you are right back doing what you do best…
experimenting and pushing the envelope Hans! Lovely to see you back
in the forum!

Jane Walker


#12

I have had a bunch of emails saying that the link I posted does not
work.

Here it is again, or go to Gemhund, the name of my you tube channel.

http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/1bg

Sorry about that.
Cheers, Hans


#13

Part two of my work in progress.

The Mini CZ Steam Engine Part 2
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/1pv

Verily, my patience is found to be tried and tested.

Cheers, Hans


#14

Amazing patience on your part, Hans. You are singularly brave to
share your process - I think you have mandated success since failure
is not an option!! You have my admiration! Judy in Kansas, where we
are seeing a dreary day with the promise of moisture. Rain would be
welcome!


#15

CZ Miniature Steam Machine Final.

I put up a new post of the final moments of the CZ machine before
life was breathed into is and it became sentient.

http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/1qs

Cheers, Hans


#16

The video shows the little guy working like crazy! Amazing work of
art and machinery. Rock on Hans.

Judy in Kansas


#17
CZ Miniature Steam Machine Final. 
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/1qs 

Look at that little bugger go! Very fun. And I’m glad you included
the photo with the matchstick-- I hadn’t realized just how small that
baby is.

Congratulations.

Noel


#18

I put this link into my FB page - jewellery and non-jewellery
’friends’ alike are fascinated and awestruck. You never know, Hans,
there might be a commission in there somewhere!

Jane Walker


#19

Hans,

AMAZING!

John


#20

Hans, Absolutely fantastic. It is a true work of art and belongs in
the Smithsonian, or Museum of Modern Art. I love it. Thanks for
making, and for sharing the pictures of that darling little steam
machine.

Alma