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18K white vs. platinum settings

Hi. I have a client who would like a 4 claw eternity band with 15pt
diamonds. She is undecided whether to get 18k white gold or
platinum. Someone mentioned to me that 18k white gold would not be as
strong a setting as the plat., and there is more risk for the
diamonds. Is this true? I would really like to offer her an opinion,
but have no idea personally since I don’t do a lot of work in plat.
(read none)

Much appreciated, as usual, you guys rock.
Stephanie Morton

Stephanie,

Platinum is a far more durable metal for prongs than 18KT. White
Gold.

Take a look at some of the Edwardian Jewelry that was created 100
years ago and you will appreciate how durable this metal is.
Jewelers created elaborate openwork designs with fine wires and set
with Diamonds. Designs that would never have been as durable in
Gold.

Good Luck
Greg DeMark
email: greg@demarkjewelry.com
Website: www.demarkjewelry.com

Several features and corresponding benefits make platinum a better
choice. Platinum is hypo-alergenic and inert against common household
chemicals such as chlorines etc. - Platinum is not prone to stress
corrosion cracking. Platinum is very dense (@35% heavier) and wears
extremely well. Since it is a white metal by nature, it will always
show white. As you may be aware, most white golds are Rhodium
(platinum) plated. Once the plating wears off, your customer may
detect a tinge of color visible. Some customers find this
problematic. Platinum prongs set dead on without any spring-back
often indicative of nickle alloy white gold.

Stephanie,

I do not know what you mean by a “4 claw eternity band” but I can
give you my opinion on the differences between the two since we do a
lot of wedding and engagement rings. ( 98% of them platinum.)

18kts. is extremely BRITTLE due to the nickel content and has a
greater tendency to crack more easily than platinum, which is
extremely SOFT and mushy due to it’s purity. An analogy between the
two could be platinum is soft like butter vs. 18kt. white is hard
like a brick. 18kt. white does not give, platinum will squish.

A ring made from platinum will outlast any 18kt. ring by decades.
That is why there are so many antique platinum rings in estates
today. Wouldn’t your customer love to pass her ring onto her heirs
for future generations to admire? Although their is of course a
large difference in price, platinum over time will be the better
investment. Just my 2 cents…

Laurie

Hi, and THANK YOU for those who offered input. What I meant by 4
claw is that the stones will be held by four claws each as opposed to
a channel set or shared claw setting - more of those little claws to
potentially get caught on stuff, me thinks. This ring will be worn
every day and I want to offer her something that will not cause
problems.

Stephanie Morton

    Several features and corresponding benefits make platinum a
better choice. Platinum is hypo-alergenic and inert against common
household chemicals such as chlorines etc. - Platinum is not prone
to stress corrosion cracking. Platinum is very dense ( AT 35%
heavier) and wears extremely well. Since it is a white metal by
nature, it will always show white. As you may be aware, most white
golds are Rhodium (platinum) plated. Once the plating wears off,
your customer may detect a tinge of color visible. Some customers
find this problematic. Platinum prongs set dead on without any
spring-back often indicative of nickle alloy white gold. 

While I agree with most of the above, I think Tony exaggerates the
density differential. This seems to be a common misperception - I’ve
even had people (who ought to know better) tell me that platinum is
twice as heavy as gold. Pure platinum is actually not much denser
than pure gold - platinum’s specific gravity being 21.4, while
gold’s is 19.3. That’s only a ~10% difference. 18k white gold’s
density is variable, depending on the alloying metals added, but
even at the lightest it has a SG of 14.7, which gives a differential
of ~31%. The heavier alloys range up to SG 16.9, for a differential
of ~21%. There are 14k alloys that are ~35% lighter than pure
platinum, however - perhaps that’s what Tony is remembering above.
See http://www.24carat.co.uk/ for a chart of specific gravity (you’ll
have to tunnel a bit - go to Information/Weights/Density of gold and
other metals (at the bottom of the Weights page).

Andrew Werby
www.unitedartworks.com